Archive For 06/29/2019

Pass mark for pilots in Diamond Storm after dawn raidvideo, photos

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Pass mark for pilots in Diamond Storm after dawn raid | video, photos HEADS UP: The Air Force’s newest air warfare combat instructors return home from Exercise Diamond Storm in the Northern Territory in the early hours of Friday morning. Picture shows a F/A-18A Hornet flying over media at RAAF Base Williamtown. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
Nanjing Night Net

HEADS UP: The Air Force’s newest air warfare combat instructors return home from Exercise Diamond Storm in the Northern Territory in the early hours of Friday morning. Picture shows a F/A-18A Hornet flying over media at RAAF Base Williamtown. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: The Air Force’s newest air warfare combat instructors return home from Exercise Diamond Storm in the Northern Territory in the early hours of Friday morning. Picture shows a F/A-18A Hornet flying over media at RAAF Base Williamtown. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

HEADS UP: A F/A-18A Hornet flies over RAAF Base Williamtown in the early hours of Friday morning, part of an exercise in the inaugural air warfare instructor course. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

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Relive the ’80s at retro music fest

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FLASHBACK: Taylor Dayne joins Paul Young, Go West, The Cutting Crew, Wang Chung, John Paul Young, Pseudo Echo and The Chantoozies at Hope Estate on November 4.
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Taylor Dayne has the voice but is no diva. This straight-talker from New York wouldn’t have survived 30 years in the music business –and counting – if she was.

The mother-of-two found fame in the 1980s with hits like Tell It To My Heart and Love Will Lead You Back,and a decade later with I’ll Be Your Shelter. Todate she has sold more than 75 million albums and released 17 top 20 singles.

Dayne has television, Broadway and film credits to her name and is about to embark on the 80s Fest tour with Go West, Paul Young, The Cutting Crew, Wang Chung, The Chantoozies and John Paul Young.

She ismatter-of-fact about her career success and refuses to subscribe to the clichethat she was somehow born to perform. It has been, she says, a lot of hard work.

“I was good at something, yes,and that was mimicking people off the radio,” she tells Weekender from the US.

“Getting on stage is a whole other issue.As a performer and an entertainer you watch and you learn and you practice, practice, practice. You put the hours in.

“I don’t think Beyonce got up there and was suddenly Beyonce. She spent hours singing in front of the mirror or in front of her parents or at talent shows, doing what she had to do.It’sby spending all those hours practising that your muscles are being designed and ultimately you might get good.

“I had a natural abilityand that’s a good ear, a really good ear, and I could pick up nuances, but I was inspired to do that. I wanted to get good at it.”​

Even after 30 years of touringshe admits to getting “kind of nervous sometimes” however is grateful for the opportunity.

“I’m very fortunate to have released music at a time when touring made money. I have songs that connected with an audience and became a soundtrack to people’s livesso Ican still tour.

“Music is very sensory. You remember exactly where you were and who you were with, what you were feeling, when you heard a song. It’s one of the most valuable art forms because it allows you to feel in different capacities.

“With these combined tours people get a lot of hits for their money.”

Dayne spent a few years in the music wilderness raising a familybut it turned out to be a well-timed break.

“I lost my record deal in 2003 or 2004 when the music industry completely started imploding on itself because of Napster and the internet. Labels were shutting down one after the next or merging.The record industry doesn’t exist like it used to. Nowhere near.

“It’s actually come full circle, though, in a way. When I started out I was an artist that actually recorded my own music, I made my own music, we funded it and I got a record deal based on the single. We’re now back in the singles game again. People rarely download entire albums.”

Her next project is writing a book about her experiences.

“I have always done things on my own terms and in my own way but I think that stems from a fear of being controlled or losing my identity. That comes from some long-ago childhood stuff, maybe. Who knows?It’s been challenging, digging deep and going back into places I haven’t searched for a long time. It’s not all roses, either.”

80s Fest comes to Hope Estate in the Hunter Valley on November 4. Tickets are on sale now through Ticketmaster.

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Shotgun, sex objects, drugs in child’s toy and a suspected dungeon: inside an alleged drug lab

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Shotgun, sex objects, drugs in child’s toy and a suspected dungeon: inside an alleged drug lab TweetFacebook Exclusive photographs of the drug lab being dismantled.AN ALLEGED Wagga drug lab capable of facilitating an interstate criminal enterprise also contained an ice-loaded water pistol, a shotgun and a suspected sex dungeon, investigators claim.
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The discoveries came as the NSW Drug Squad dismantled theOura Roadclandestine set-up on Thursday afternoon.

Police have so far seized six guns –including a high-calibre shotgun – about an ounce of methamphetamine, cannabisand a haul of ammunition.

Forensic examiners were forced to sidestep around sex toys, which were scattered through the property’s gardens.

As paraphernalia was removed from thegarage, the sheer size of the operation became apparent.

Detective Inspector Darren Cloake said it was the most sophisticated laboratory he has seen in Wagga.

“This is the firstchemical-based laboratory I’ve seen here,” he said.

“Our chemical operations unit conducted a preliminary investigation of the lab and there is a strong inference that lab has been used for the manufacture of amphetamine-based drugs.

“There was also a number of personal items scattered around the property and a suspect area inside the garage.”

The 44-year-old Oura Road occupant wascharged on Thursday with firearm-related offences and for possessing a prohibited drug, with further charges expected once a forensic analysis is complete.

He was granted conditional bail in the meantime.

Inspector Cloake said a five-year-old child found in the property was still living at the home.

“The child is still in the care of the family,” he said.

“Police have made a mandatory notification to Family and Community Services (FACS) to care for the wellbeing of that child in the future.”

The bust came during a trifecta of police search warrants, initiated at a property inCondon Avenue, Mount Austin on Tuesday.

Detectives believe all three men were connected.

Condon Avenue’s Michael Wood, 30, appeared before Wagga Local Court on Wednesday, charged with supplying 14.82 grams of methamphetamine, holding a .177 calibre rifle and supplying 345 grams of cannabis.

He was refused bail by police and issued with a show cause notice to reappear at court in August.

Border Mail

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‘Reckless’ judge shortage puts domestic violence victims at risk

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DANGEROUS: Retired Newcastle Federal Circuit Court judge Giles Coakes, with Newcastle MP Sharon Claydon and Chris White, president of the Hunter Valley Family Lawyers Practitioners Association. PICTURE: Max Mason-Hubers HUNTER women seeking to escape domestic violence and children subject to abuse are being placed at even greater risk of harm because of the Turnbull government’s failure to fill a Newcastle Federal Circuit Court judge position vacant since February.
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New statistics obtained exclusively by theNewcastle Heraldreveal the two judges currently serving the city’sunder-staffed Federal Circuit Court, which deals only with family law matters, have been forced to shoulder a“reckless” work-load more than double the national average.

Chris White, the presidentof the Hunter Valley Family LawPractitioners, says delays in the courts are helping to “compounda history of people believing that the system isn’t responsive to their very serious examples of domestic violence”.

“Peopleare hearing in the media that [domestic violence] is a big worry for the community, and the government says it’sdoing everythingit can,yet when peopleseek to address these issues, the court system is just not there [for them],” he said.

Figures from the Attorney General George Brandis’soffice released to Newcastle MP Sharon Claydon revealFederal Circuit Court judges in Newcastle have each dealt with a projected case-load of some 770 matters this financial yearcompared to the national average of 376.

That has helped push the time it takes for a case to reach a trial in Newcastle to almost 19 months, a situationlegal experts say is failingthe region’s most vulnerablepeopleand pushing the justice system to the brink.

“We’re talking aboutpeople who aregoing through marital breakdowns, child custody disputes, families withdrug and alcohol abuse issues,” Ms Claydon said.

“They’realready at the end of their tether by the time theyget to court, and now we’re forcing them to waityears for a resolution.

“It’s a dangerous holding pattern for some of these families to be in.”

Mr White agreed, saying that on the“coal face” it was a huge concern for the city’s legal representatives.

RECKLESS: Attorney General George Brandis has been criticised for taking too long to appoint judges to the Newcastle Federal Circuit Court. PICTURE: Andrew Meares

He said he had been involved in one case earlier this yearwhere a father withdrug abuse and mental health issues had, despite having little previous contact with his daughter,“run off” with the child to Queensland.

He sought an urgent hearing to deal with the matter, but wasn’t able to get it before a judge for almost two months.

“In the meantime alittle girl who does’t know her father has effectively been kidnapped, for want of a better word, and the court is unable to deal with that because of a lack of resources,” he said.

“It might seem like ashort period in the context of a child’s life, but the consequenceis an indelible mark left on the child that willstay with them for their rest of their lives.”

The problem dates back to when former Newcastle Federal Circuit Court judge GilesCoakes retired in June 2015 after 11 years on the bench.

Mr Brandis waited four months before appointing his replacement, JusticeSteven Middleton, allowing the case load of the two remaining judges to blow out.

Then in February this year Justice Matthew Myers left the court after beingappointed to lead theAustralian Law Reform Commission’s inquiry intoincarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Five months laterhis position has still not been filled, and Mr Coakes has accusedMr Brandisof being “reckless” and “negligent” by taking so long to make the appointment.

“It simply doesn’t need to take this long,” the retired judgesaid.

“Mr Brandis is failing in his responsibility as the primary law officer in the country, and he offers no excuses.”

Mr Coakes said the massiveworkload being handled by the two judgeshad“dangerous implications”.

“It means there is theincreased risk of anoversight, a mistake in calculations, or risk of not giving enough weight to a specific piece of evidence,” he said.

“All of those things stem from hurrying, which comes from the pressure to produce a result.

“It’s awful, quite frankly, and I’m surprised there hasn’t been mental breakdowns.”

However aspokeswoman for Mr Brandis saida permanent appointment was“under active consideration”.

“The appointment of a judge to a court is an important decision to which the Attorney General gives careful consideration, giving regard to a broad range of issues, including the expertise and background of potential candidates as well as consultation with relevant persons,” she said.

Newcastle Herald

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‘This must not distract us’

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STOIC: A group of survivors, including Andrew Collins and Peter Blenkiron, travelled to Rome to watch Cardinal Pell give evidence to the royal commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse in 2016. Picture: Adam Trafford Ballarat clergy sexual abuse survivors hope Cardinal George Pell’s trial will not distract from implementing the royal commission’s recommendations.
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Peter Blenkiron, who was abused by disgraced Christian Brother Edward Dowlan, said whether Cardinal Pell was guilty or not was a red herring.

“If we focus on one person, on one issue, then that can distract the whole community and eclipse what really needs to change,” he said.

“We must not take our eyes off the ball and we must make sure all recommendations are implemented.”

The $500 million inquiry is Australia’s longest royal commission, starting in 2013 and due to finish with a final report to the federal government in December.

Chairman Justice Peter McClellan said governments and institutions needed to focus on redress and regulatory changes, “designed to ensure that so far as possible no child is abused in an institutional context in the future”.

Sex abuse survivor Peter Blenkiron

Mr Blenkiron echoed this sentiment following revelations Cardinal Pell had been charged with historical sexual assault offences on Thursday, arguing Ballarat residents must not lose sight of protecting children and preventing more premature deaths.

Fellow survivor Andrew Collins, who travelled with Mr Blenkiron to meet Cardinal Pell during his royal commission testimony in Rome in 2016, said the Catholic Church leader had done little to address Ballarat’s mental health crisis in the two years since.

“The cardinal told us in Rome that he would assist victims, but as yet, nothing has happened,” Mr Collins said.”We are now a little concerned about who will take the mantle.”

Philip Nagle, who was abused by disgraced Christian Brother Stephen Farrell, said Cardinal Pell’s trial would not hinder the recovery of Ballarat survivors. “George hasn’t done anything anyhow,” he said.”It’s very important for the survivors who have made claims against George that this is followed through.”

The Ballarat Courier

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